Giuseppe Carlo Castellano

PhD

Contact Information

Email: g.castellano@utoronto.ca

Bio and Research

Giuseppe Carlo Castellano is a Postdoctoral Fellow working with Professor Seth Bernard on the SSHRC-funded project, “An economic history of the Roman conquest of Italy, 500–200 BCE.” With one foot in North America and the other in Europe, Dr. Castellano has lived and been educated between London, Rome, and New York, and several places besides. He was formerly a Postdoctoral Fellow of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Engaged Scholar Initiative. Dr. Castellano received his BA in Classics from Columbia University in 2009 and both his MA and PhD in Classical Archaeology from the University of Texas at Austin (in 2016 and 2019 respectively) with a dissertation entitled “A Dialogue in Metal: Silver, Bronze, and Cross-Cultural Currencies in Italy and Sicily.”

Dr. Castellano’s primary scholarly focus is on cultural contact through material culture in the ancient Western Mediterranean, with particular interest in Italy and Sicily. More specifically, Dr. Castellano studies how the indigenous inhabitants of Italy and Sicily, for example the Etruscans and Italic peoples, interacted with new arrivals like Greeks and Phoenicians through the trade in metal and the exchange of metallic currencies.

Dr. Castellano takes an interdisciplinary approach that includes traditional numismatic methods, history, archaeology, data and statistical analysis, archaeometallurgy, and other digital and scientific methods. Other interests include: ethnicity and identity in the ancient world; ancient economy; military history; élite networks, material culture, and self-presentation; Italian urbanism; the longue durée and Bronze to Iron Age continuity in Italy; antiquarianism and the history of collecting.

Research Interests

Archaeology and history of Italy and Sicily; Italic peoples and the Etruscans; Greek colonization; cultural contact; numismatics; élite self-representation; metallurgy and the metal trade; Italian urbanism; military history; digital humanities; antiquarianism and the history of collecting

Relevant Links

Detailed CV

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