Carrie Atkins on Cyprus underwater project, summer 2019

In June 2019, Carrie Atkins returned to Maroni-Tsaroukkas, Cyprus, with a team to wrap up the first stage of survey of the Bronze Age anchorage. The international team included students and researchers from UofT, Cornell, and Texas A&M University. Between the 2018 and 2019 seasons, about a meter of sand had been deposited in the central region of the site and scoured away from the eastern part. The scouring meant that more anchors and ceramics were visible. The team worked non-stop to record over 13 new anchors, 5 new blocks, and over 50 sherds. Sampling of the seabed was also undertaken, and there are some encouraging preliminary results in the work by a graduate student from Texas A&M, who is using optically stimulated luminescence in order to assess deposition of anchors. The photogrammetry results from the dive scooter provide a 3D image of the seabed, and preliminary results from the ROV are promising. The project is transitioning to the next phase of research to investigate site formation processes in order to understand how much the seabed and costal zone have changed since the Late Bronze Age.

UofT undergraduate, Stepan Popov, uncovers and prepares to record a 3-hole anchor.

UofT undergraduate, Stepan Popov, uncovers and prepares to record a 3-hole anchor.

Between the 2018 and 2019 seasons, about one meter of sand was deposited across the central region of the site.

A diver prepares to record a large stone block, estimated to weigh 1 ton.

The dive team prepares to set up a new quadrant for survey.

The dive team prepares to set up a new quadrant for survey.