GCCU General Meeting

Woodbury Library

The Graduate Classics Course Union (GCCU) will be holding their December meeting this day.

Congrats to Chiara Graf for winning the 2018 John J. Winkler Memorial Prize!

Our very own Chiara Graf has won the 2018 John J. Winkler Prize for her essay “Seneca’s Ugly Feelings.” The prestigious prize is offered each year to the author of the best North-American undergraduate or graduate essay “in any risky or marginal field of classical studies.” Chiara was invited to Oberlin to present her paper at the beginning of the month.

Congrats, Chiara!

Congrats to Matt Watton for winning the Robinson Prize in Ancient Philosophy

Our very own PhD student, Matt Watton, has won the 2017-2018 Sidney Robinson Prize in Ancient Philosophy for his Major Field essay, “Antiochus’ Interpretation of Socrates.” The Robinson Prize, sponsored by the Collaborative Programme in Ancient and Medieval Philosophy (CPAMP), is awarded each year for the best paper written by a University of Toronto graduate student in any of the participating CPAMP units (Classics, Medieval Studies, Philosophy) on any topic in ancient Greek or Roman philosophy (up to 529 A.D.). Congrats, Matt!

 

Alumna News: Dr. Mariapia Pietropaolo at McMaster

Dr. Mariapia Pietropaolo joined the Department of Classics at McMaster University as an Assistant Professor in the summer of 2018.

Dr. Pietropaolo received her PhD in Classics from the University of Toronto in 2013. She has taught at the University of Toronto and the University of Missouri. Her research focuses on the poets of the Augustan age, and her current projects include a book on the grotesque in Roman love elegy and a study of the aesthetics of Narcissism in Ovid.

Call for Papers: Classics in the Anthropocene, UofT Graduate Conference

University of Toronto, Department of Classics, Graduate Conference 
April 19-20, 2019 

Keynote Speakers: Brooke Holmes (Princeton), Katherine Blouin (Toronto) 

The recent popularity of the notion of “the Anthropocene” reflects a growing recognition that human societies and their natural environments radically and reciprocally shape and influence one another. Additionally, there is a looming sense that the ecological conditions under which humankind has thrived for millennia are about to undergo a set of epochal transformations. Speculations about the near-future range from optimistic to pessimistic extremes. Will there be a collective and self-conscious effort to re-shape civilization as we have known it, or a total extinction of life on earth? In either case, humanity faces an unprecedented crisis.

This crisis provides a novel horizon of meaning for the interpretation of human society and culture, past as well as present. The task of rethinking traditional categories such as history, culture, individuality, and nature, has become both possible and necessary. In many disciplines this work is already underway.

The question guiding this year’s conference is how the study of classical literature, philosophy, history, and archeology, might contribute to this rethinking. This might involve investigating the ways ancient attitudes have or have not influenced present ones; how ancient authors conceived of their environment; how ancient authors conceptualized the place of human beings in nature; ancient methods of exploitation and/or preservation of resources; ancient experiences of environmental change. Further potential topics of interest are (but are not limited to):

  • ancient conceptions of nature in general
  • natural disasters, cataclysms, conflagrations, apocalypses
  • nature, politics, imperialism
  • technology and human agency
  • scientific expertise and political deliberation
  • human migration and its relation to environmental change
  • nature in ancient mythology and/or religion
  • ancient philosophical thought about the finitude of civilizations, planets, etc.
  • individual and collective responsibility, inherited guilt: is the Anthropocene in some sense “tragic”?
  • philosophical ethics as learning how to die

Guidelines for submission: Graduate students and early career scholars are invited to submit abstracts of no more than 300 words, for papers of 15-20 minutes in length, to uoftclassicsconference@gmail.com by January 7, 2019. Please include your name and institution in the submission email, but leave the abstract anonymous. Accepted participants will be notified by email in late January. Any questions may be directed to the above email.

Modern Language Exam

LI103

PhD candidates must successfully complete translation examinations in two modern foreign languages before taking the examination on the Major Field. One of these languages must be German; the other is normally French, but the Graduate Coordinator may authorize the substitution of Italian if it is appropriate for the candidate’s field of specialization. Students intending to write one or both papers should notify the Department at least two weeks prior to the date of exam.

Cover Letter Workshop

LI205

Prof. Seth Bernard has organized a cover letter workshop for grad students currently on the job market or applying to anything that requires a cover letter. Attendees should bring a draft of their letter to be edited within the group.

 

GCCU Orientation for New Graduate Students

LI220

The Graduate Classics Course Union (GCCU) will be hosting an informal orientation event for incoming classics MA and PhD students. We’ll talk about things like the reading lists, scholarships, Toronto life, and anything new students are interested in hearing more about.

Afterwards, there will be a quick tour of campus on our way to Future Bistro for a GCCU funded drink.

All classicists are welcome to come to the orientation and or the pub.