Bursaries for Summer Courses in Greek and Latin in the Department of Classics

The Department of Classics at the University of Toronto is offering a series of Greek and Latin courses this coming summer.

In the First summer term, from May 6 to June 14 (followed by an exam), we offer LAT 101, LAT 201, and GRK 101. In the Second summer term, from July 2 to August 12 (followed by an exam), we offer LAT 102, LAT 202, and GRK 102.

The Department is especially interested in furthering the language study of students from underrepresented groups. In order to assist in enrolling in these courses, we offer bursaries in the range of $ 1,500 (one term) to $ 3,000 (two terms) to cover tuition and more, for deserving students both from the U of T and from other institutions.

For more information, visit our website and contact our Undergraduate Coordinator Eph Lytle (undergrad.classics@utoronto.ca) or the Chair Christer Bruun (chair.classics@utoronto.ca)

A Cultural History of Work in Antiquity, a recent publication edited by Eph Lytle

A Cultural History of Work

Congratulations to Prof. Lytle for the publication of his edited monograph, A Cultural History of Work in Antiquity, the first book in a six-volume set.

From the publisher:

“How has our relationship with ‘work’ changed for different cultures over the centuries? What effect has it had on politics, art and religion?

In a work that spans 2,500 years these ambitious questions are addressed by 63 experts, each contributing their overview of a theme applied to a period in history. With the help of a broad range of case material they illustrate broad trends and nuances of the culture of work in Western culture from antiquity to the present. Individual volume editors ensure the cohesion of the whole, and to make it as easy as possible to use, chapter titles are identical across each of the volumes. This gives the choice of reading about a specific period in one of the volumes, or following a theme across history by reading the relevant chapter in each of the six.”

U of T Classics at the AIA/SCS

Many members of the Department of Classics will be giving presentations at the AIA/SCS annual meeting in San Diego, January 4 – 6! In chronological order, here are our speakers on the SCS program:

Ted Parker, “Philanthrōpia, Democracy, and the Proof of Power”, FRI 8:00 –10:30

Jeff Easton, “A Case-Study of Intergenerational Participation in Roman Professional Associations”, FRI 1:45 – 4:45

John Fabiano, “Invidia Tabernariorum: The Economic Interests of Associations in Late-Antique Rome, a Study of the Corpus Tabernariorum, SAT 8:00 – 10:30

Rachel Mazzara, “The Secondary World of Plautinopolis”, SAT 8:00 – 10:30

Brad Hald, “Dialectics of Hope and Fear in Thucydides Book 6”, SAT 1:45 – 4:45

Alison Keith, “Ovid In and After Exile: Modern Fiction on Ovid Outside Rome”, SUN 8:00 – 11:00

Marion Durand, “De Mortuis Nil Dicendum Est? On Sextus Empiricus Against the Mathematicians VIII.98 and Stoic Indefinite Propositions”, SUN 11:45 – 1:45

David Wallace-Hare, “The Virgilian Beech: The Creation of Italian Nostalgia in the Eclogues”, SUN 11:45 – 1:45

Chiara Graf, “The Blushing Sage: Somatic Affective Responses in Seneca’s Epistulae Morales“, SUN 2:00 – 4:30

Matt Watton, “Socrates and Plato’s Socrates in Cicero’s Academica“, SUN 2:00 – 4:30

GOOD LUCK TO EVERYONE!

U of T Reception in San Diego at the SCS/AIA Annual Meeting!

The Department of Classics hosts its usual Reception for alumnae and alumni, friends, faculty and students on Thursday, 3 January, from 8:00 to 10:00, in the Marriott Marquis San Diego Marina, room Rancho Santa Fe 2. Spread the word … all welcome!

And that is not all: nine of our graduate students present papers at the conference, and so do several faculty members.

Alumnus News: Cillian O’Hogan at the Centre for Medieval Studies, UofT

Cillian O’Hogan took up a position as Assistant Professor of Medieval Latin in the Centre for Medieval Studies at the University of Toronto this past summer.

After completing his dissertation here in the Department of Classics in 2011 (a dissertation which has since become a book!), Cillian worked as a visiting Assistant Professor of Latin in the Department of Classical, Near Eastern, and Religious Studies at UBC, as a post-doc in the Department of Classical Studies at the University of Waterloo, and as a curator in the Ancient, Medieval, and Early Modern Manuscripts section of the British Library.

Congrats, Cillian!

Greeced Lightning

(pictured: Rachel Dewan, Emily Mohr, Chiara Graf, Ted Parker)

This past Saturday, grad students from the Classics and Art History departments took part in a “virtual 5k” fundraiser called “Greeced Lightning” in support of The Sportula, an initiative that seeks to increase access to Classics by providing microgrants to economically marginalized undergraduates.

You can support The Sportula at this website and learn more about the initiative here and here.

Congrats to Chiara Graf for winning the 2018 John J. Winkler Memorial Prize!

Our very own Chiara Graf has won the 2018 John J. Winkler Prize for her essay “Seneca’s Ugly Feelings.” The prestigious prize is offered each year to the author of the best North-American undergraduate or graduate essay “in any risky or marginal field of classical studies.” Chiara was invited to Oberlin to present her paper at the beginning of the month.

Congrats, Chiara!

Alumnus News: Dr. Timothy Perry appointed Medieval Manuscript and Early Book Librarian at the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library

Following his graduation from the doctoral programme, Timothy Perry (PhD 2010) spent two years as a lecturer in Classics at Dartmouth College.

Timothy then returned to school, completing a Master of Information degree in Library and Information Science at the University of Toronto’s iSchool in 2015. While at the iSchool, he was also actively involved in the Book History and Print Culture program and worked as a Printing Fellow at the Massey College Press.

Upon completing his MI, Timothy took up a position as Special Collections Librarian at the University of Missouri. He has now returned to the University of Toronto, where he has recently been appointed Medieval Manuscript and Early Book Librarian at the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library.

His work as a rare book librarian provides plenty of opportunities to practice his Greek and Latin, and he also teaches classes visiting the Fisher from a variety of departments – without having to do any marking.

Congrats to Matt Watton for winning the Robinson Prize in Ancient Philosophy

Our very own PhD student, Matt Watton, has won the 2017-2018 Sidney Robinson Prize in Ancient Philosophy for his Major Field essay, “Antiochus’ Interpretation of Socrates.” The Robinson Prize, sponsored by the Collaborative Programme in Ancient and Medieval Philosophy (CPAMP), is awarded each year for the best paper written by a University of Toronto graduate student in any of the participating CPAMP units (Classics, Medieval Studies, Philosophy) on any topic in ancient Greek or Roman philosophy (up to 529 A.D.). Congrats, Matt!

 

Alumna News: Dr. Mariapia Pietropaolo at McMaster

Dr. Mariapia Pietropaolo joined the Department of Classics at McMaster University as an Assistant Professor in the summer of 2018.

Dr. Pietropaolo received her PhD in Classics from the University of Toronto in 2013. She has taught at the University of Toronto and the University of Missouri. Her research focuses on the poets of the Augustan age, and her current projects include a book on the grotesque in Roman love elegy and a study of the aesthetics of Narcissism in Ovid.